Book Review: The Savernake Novels #7


One Misty Moisty Morning, Susanna M Newstead "One misty moisty morning, when cloudy was the weather, I met with an old man a-clothèd all in leather. He was clothèd all in leather, with a cap beneath his chin, Singing 'How d'ye do and how d'ye do and how d'ye do again'." This is the title … Continue reading Book Review: The Savernake Novels #7

Imaginative Ancestry: 1. The shifting fabric


“Our imagination craves to behold our ancestors as they really were, going about their daily business and daily pleasure. In fact the whole appeal of history (and ancestry) (my addition) is imaginative, and without social history especially, economic history is barren and political history is unintelligible” These words are taken from the opening chapter of … Continue reading Imaginative Ancestry: 1. The shifting fabric

Book Review: Cross Channel


A slight pause in my ancestry blogging as I post here a review of a book of short stories about the British in France by Julian Barnes, revealing, thought provoking and occasionally hilarious! I quite like France, especially many of their cultural aspects, the people and of course the wine. Reading this book took me … Continue reading Book Review: Cross Channel

Book Review: The Sense Of An Ending; Julian Barnes


The style of writing in this book makes for very easy reading, unlike an earlier work by Julian Barnes, Flaubert’s Parrot! Each page held my attention without wanting to skip ahead to find out what happened next, every sentence and paragraph revealed a little something about Tony, his life, and those times from the 1960s and beyond.

Book Review: The Art of Travel


This is the book, written by Alain de Botton, that completely revolutionised our approach to travel, opening our eyes to our surroundings, putting us in touch with our environment ...... this book is mindfulness personified. Structurally the book is divided into four main sections ......... Departure, Motives, Landscape, Art, with each one being the focus … Continue reading Book Review: The Art of Travel