England gets a bloody nose!


In my ignorance we visited Upnor Castle in our “usual mode” of being interested in the building and it’s purpose, but unusually for us, without any research into its history or related events. Because of this a bit of a shock was delivered within a few minutes of our arrival! (This is a follow up … Continue reading England gets a bloody nose!

The best outdoors museum in England?


If museums provide a glimpse into the past, then “living museums” are a window into the lives of our ancestors. The Royal Naval Dockyard at Chatham once occupied 400 acres and employed 10,000 skilled craftsmen along the banks of the River Medway in Kent. This is the county of my ancestors flowing back from my … Continue reading The best outdoors museum in England?

Industrial Rides: The Gladstone Pottery Museum


A lovely museum with three perfectly preserved bottle kilns and workshops showing the working of a typical pottery during the Industrial Revolution. If you’ve read Arnold Bennett Anna of the Five Towns you must visit this place.

Three reasons to visit an industrial museum for family trees


The Maritime District of Bristol in the West of England was once the centre of Britain's largest port and today is a wonderful centre for visiting and understanding how some of your ancestors MAY have been connected to or influenced by some of the events occurring here. For example Isambard Kingdom Brunel lived and worked … Continue reading Three reasons to visit an industrial museum for family trees

Peaky Blinders, Steampunk and Steam Engines all in one day.


England has a number of Industrial Museums dedicated to showcasing the entrepreneurial spirit and creative engineering of the Industrial Revolution, especially the period 1750 to 1900. One of these is less than 75 miles from our home. The Black Country Living Museum is a brilliant example of the preservation of working artefacts from that era, … Continue reading Peaky Blinders, Steampunk and Steam Engines all in one day.