Was this the birthplace of a revolution that changed the world?


Coalbrookdale is a truly significant place in the history of the Industrial Revolution. It was here that Abraham Darby changed ironmaking by using coke instead of charcoal and his original furnace is preserved as a historic reminder.

How a “revolution” leads to a social war!


The English county of Kent has been known as The Garden of England for over 400 years and dates back to a dish of Kentish cherries which particularly satisfied King Henry VIII. And, despite a survey in 2006 declaring North Yorkshire to have taken the title, as Charles Dickens proclaimed, “Kent, sir, everyone knows Kent. … Continue reading How a “revolution” leads to a social war!

Industrial Rides: A Cornish tin mine ….. “crushing suffocation”!


My great grandfather, William Waters, was born in 1841, and by the time of the Census 1851 he was 9 years old and working in a Cornish tin mine alongside his father, Joseph. When the 1891 census was taken he was 49 years old and working in a Cumbrian iron ore mine with his son, … Continue reading Industrial Rides: A Cornish tin mine ….. “crushing suffocation”!

Imaginative Ancestry #5: A PEST in Cobbett’s England!


Imaginative ancestry means creating a picture in your mind’s eye of the conditions in which your ancestors, or a particular group of them, lived. But you won’t create this picture by looking at birth certificates, probate documents, old photographs, newspaper clippings; you need to get in amongst the historical context of the decade, century, era … Continue reading Imaginative Ancestry #5: A PEST in Cobbett’s England!

SatNav and the man who “cracked” Longitude


The solution of how to accurately measure longitude was discovered by John Harrison in the 1700s, but not before a mighty struggle with “the establishment” who wrongly believed that navigation by the moon and stars was the answer. The final day of our South Coast Tour of England at Greenwich Royal Observatory.