The wine with the musk-like taste!


I wonder if anyone knows what is the wine that is actually named “the wine with a musk-like taste”? It’s French, and unusually, in fact uniquely, the wine is not named after the grape as in Alsace, or as per the appellation as in the rest of France. It’s a white wine, quite dry, and highly recommended in the accompaniment with seafood, especially oysters. It is made in the Loire Valley near the city of Nantes, and in fact is the wine made in the greatest volume in the whole of the Loire. So, more than the white Chenin Blanc of Savennieres, more than the red Cabernet Franc of Saumur, Chinon and Bourgeuil, and more than the white Sauvignon Blanc of Sancerre and Pouilly Fume. The grape used to make this wine is Melon de Bourgogne and I’m willing to bet that very few people reading this have heard of this either. Have you worked out what it is yet?

I bought a single bottle of this wine recommended by Joanna Locke MW, the buyer of wines from Alsace, Loire, South Africa and Portugal for the U.K. Wine Society. It was only £7.95 and a bargain ……. but not to my taste. That does NOT mean that it was a wine of low quality, or that there was anything wrong with it, just simply that I have a preference for a couple of different wines with my oysters!

Click here for the answer to The Wine that I bought, and here for background to The Wine With The Musk-like Taste



Categories: Loire, Wine

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

12 replies

  1. Quite enjoyed a Muscadet Sevre et Maine (sur lie) 2017, a couple of years ago. The ‘sur lie’ process gave it a bit body than normal I think. Not a wine I have seen around much but that one was from ALDI of all places.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Not something I have ever tried.

    Liked by 1 person

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